modern Houses by HGK Hamburger Grundstückskontor

A beautiful family home (Bauhaus style)

Genista Jurgens Genista Jurgens
Google+
Loading admin actions …

Pushing the idea that architects and designers should be able to work in harmony with the industrialists, the Bauhaus school championed the fusion of design and function. With a desire to unify art and craft with technology, the school taught that buildings, objects, furniture, and even theater sets can be visually attractive, and practical—and that each is as important as the other. And it's this balance between form and function that influences the home we are featuring today. 

Built by German architects HGK HAMBURGER GRUNDSTÜCKSKONTOR, this two story home is beautiful and modern. Constructed from concrete and glass, it noticeably lacks any ornamentation. Instead, it shows off bold shapes, clean edges and a minimal facade. 

So for all of those Bauhaus fans out there (and even those who are unsure of this aesthetic), let's take a tour around this elegant house sitting on the banks of Blankenese, just outside of Hamburg, Germany.   

At home in Hamburg.

Situated in the leafy suburbs of Hamburg, the front of the house makes the most of the property and it's privacy, with glass facades on both levels looking out onto the large lawn. A small wooden deck and sliding doors join the garden space with that of the indoors. 

Light and dark.

The extensive glass walls on this side of the house will allow plenty of natural light in, warming the interior. It also means the rest of the house can be constructed from solid concrete walls without making the rooms inside too dark. 

This play of positive and negative spaces (concrete vs glass) is integral to the design aesthetic of Bauhaus.  

Cut outs.

From the driveway you can see just how artistic the overall design of the house is. The alcove or recess appears 'cut out' from the lower level and moved over, and added to the opposite side of the house. 

So instead of tacking a carport onto the exterior, the architects have integrated it into the main structure, perfectly blending form with function in the process. 

A mix of materials.

Concrete not only features on the outside of this home—inside it is left raw, uncolored and uncovered as the ceilings and floors. To stop it from looking too cold and sterile, the design team have paired it with cupboards built from natural timbre. 

Barely any barriers.

Moving upstairs, the interior is kept open plan and barrier free with low, glass partitions at the edges. On this level, the ceiling and walls are painted white to help keep the space feeling large and unhindered.

Equal parts of a whole.

Downstairs feels equally as roomy as up top. To balance out the dark, concreted ceiling and floor, the two side walls opposite each other are glass. 

No small spaces or corners have been created with any sort of divisions making the whole level feel cozy but not claustrophobic. 

Shafts of light.

Echoing the 'cutout' shape we saw on the exterior (the carport), a fireplace has been built into one wall, giving the living room extra warmth and light. 

And it's not the only thing—the spaces left between the two levels allow yet more shafts of light spill into the lower level.  

Perfectly poised.

The kitchen features a wall of wooden cabinets like those lining the hallway to break the severity of the concrete slabs. The white kitchen island is stunningly simple and striking designed, with a complementary ventilation system installed above. 

With every little detail, gap, shape, proportion in this home so carefully considered and calculated, it's no surprise the whole home is so harmonious. It's a true representation of the beauty of Bauhaus! 

For another Bauhaus inspired home, take a look around this one

What's your opinion on the Bauhaus aesthetic? Do you love it or loathe it?
modern Houses by Casas inHAUS

Need help with your home project? Get in touch!

Request free consultation

Discover home inspiration!